[Different handwriting starts here]

Dearest! Basia has given you a full update. When we hear back from you, we’ll write in greater detail. Your sister Olya. 

Many kisses to all. Bela

Kisses, Bronia

Awaiting your reply impatiently. 

While written in Oct. 1941, the envelope was postmarked in NY on March 21, 1942

9 October 1941

 

My dearest! 

I’ve meant to write you, please let me know of your well-being. After the war erupted, Olya and kids came to stay with me in Kiev, but once Kiev became dangerous we were evacuated farther out. Now, we are very far from family – in Krasnodar region. Mom, dad, and Shaya stayed behind. We do not hear anything from them at all, none to this day [it’s impossible to get]. I beg you please, maybe there is a way for you to find out about them and let them know that we are alive and well. Can you imagine how worried we are to not know anything of their situation. My husband Grisha is on the front [means “he is fighting in the military”], but I get letters from him, thank goodness. We – meaning myself, Olya and kids – are alive and well and awaiting impatiently good news and return home to our beloved family. Write to us about your health, we would feel better if we could [stay in touch?] at least with you. Write in care of my husband’s relative in Moscow, she will receive mail sooner and will resend to us. Her address: Moscow. Station Novogireevo. 6th Prospect. Dacha 2a/6. Reiderman. 

 

We look forward to hearing from you, maybe you have any updates of them. Stay well and happy, hope to see you soon. Kiss you all. Yours, Basia. 

We are staying with my husband’s sister and her husband.